Awards presented at the Norwegian International Film Festival in Haugesund

Tonight the awards were presented during the closing ceremony of the 44th Norwegian International Film Festival in Haugesund.

 

This year’s award winners are:

(information on each prize and the jury members follow at the bottom of this mail)

 

The Audience Award

The Audience Award went to Perfect Strangers from Italy. It is directed by Paolo Genovese.

Jury statement: An elegant portrait of human relationships in our age, even though the film’s theme is timeless. It has a great pace, never too fast, never too slow, always on time. It is tragic, funny and engages its audience. 

The film is produced by Marco Belardi and distributed by Fidalgo.

 

The Ray of Sunshine

This year’s Ray of Sunshine went to Magnus, directed by Benjamin Ree.

Jury statement: “This year’s Ray of Sunshine is a film that manages to fill us with enthusiasm and move us on many levels.  The feedback from both the press and the audience is uniformly positive. This is a film where the human being is at the centre, proving how love and community can bring out the very best in us. This is the story of an extraordinary human being and talent, and through tight and respectful dramaturgy, as well as a good helping of humour, we get deeply under the skin of its protagonist. We are impressed by the combination of archival footage and clips from the current times, which all together allow us to get to know a family we would have liked to be part of. This film deserves a big movie theatre screen and a long life in the cinema”.

The film is produced by Sigurd Mikal Karoliussen and distributed by Norsk Film Distribusjon.

 

The Andreas Award

The ecumenical Andreas Award this year went to the French film The Innocents. It is directed by Anne Fontaine and produced by Eric and Nicolas Altmayer.

Jury statement: “This year’s award winner is based on a true story from the times just after World War II, and is the agonising story of innocents subjected to abuse. War always demands its victims and evil can also strike down the most God-fearing people. With a stylistically assured cinematography and convincing actors eschewing cliches, the film takes us inside a Polish monastery, where the nuns have been subjected to terrifyingly evil deeds.  Everything the nuns have left is the concern and vigour of a young French woman of the Red Cross. The film reaches all the way to the bottom of the dark room it is exploring, but still succeeds in formulating the following response to the problem of evil: «Faith is 24 hours of doubt and one minute of hope.”

The Norwegian distributor is Tour de Force.

 

The Norwegian Film Critics Award in Haugesund

The Norwegian Film Critics Award in Haugesund went to Toni Erdmann, directed by Maren Ade.

Jury statement: “This year’s winner of the Norwegian Film Critics Award in Haugesund is as wise as it is surprising and funny. It tells the story of a father and daughter, and the humour springs from the silent dialogue between them as they struggle to meet each other’s gaze. The actress Sandra Hüller’s suggestive body language is a study in comical low-key acting in relation to her opponent Peter Simonischek. The director is a sharp but at the same time patient observer, with a deep love for the protagonists, inviting the audience to participate in each and every scene. This winner is something as rare as a comedy with deep resonance and great re-watch value.”

The film is produced by Komplizen Film and distributed by Arthaus.

 

The FIPRESCI Award

This year’s award went to The Day Will Come from Denmark. It is directed by Jesper W. Nielsen.

Jury statement: «Set between a dark age and the Space Age, this film dramatises a nightmarish chapter of history with an emotional force and a veracity that transcend simple paradigms of good and evil. The jury praises the director for drawing consistently powerful and measured performances from his entire cast, especially the two children at the heart of the story».

The film is produced by Zentropa Entertainments.

 

Best Project Award

This year’s award went to Amundsen & Nobile, directed by Katja Næss. The award is the result of a vote among the participants at the Nordic Co-Production Market.

 

Next Nordic Generation Award

The award went the Swedish movie I`ll try again, directed by Jo Widerberg fra Akademin Valand

Jury statement: ”This year’s addition of Next Nordic Generation shows a tremendous variety amongst up-and-coming Nordic film makers. The winning film, chosen by a unanimous jury, excels with a story which feels free from plot constructions. It makes use of an organic and dynamic dialogue, and at its core is a genuine warmth, a presence and a will to deliver a raw and truthful portrait of every-day-life. 30 minutes fly by in an engaging drama where three generations of women discuss a potentially life-changing dilemma openly, generously and refreshingly free from any sense of guilt”

 

 

Eurimages Lab Project Award

This award is a new prize this year and went to The Wind Blew On from Iceland. It is directed by Katrín Ólafsdóttir and produced by International/Incohérence. The prize is given by Eurimages, to the most promising cutting-edge film presented as a work in progress.

Jury statement: «We were struck by the beauty of the images and the whole cinematic approach. The concept of the film creates an emotional journey, which reaches out directly to us, the viewers. The jury respects the Commitment of this filmmaker to the strong vision and the Independent way of developing the project.»

 

 

The following awards were presented earlier this week:

 

The Faun of the City of Haugesund

The faun this year went to Håkon Skogrand, the former Programme Director of the Norwegian International Film Festival.

 

The Hestenes Award

This year’s winner of the Hestenes Award is Bernhard Ellefsen, literary critic at the newspaper Morgenbladet.

 

The Norwegian International Film Festival and Liv Ullmann Honorary Award

The award this year went to the Swedish actress Pernilla August.

The Norwegian International Film Festival and Liv Ullmann Honorary Award is to be given to an actor or director who has significantly contributed to film art through an outstanding ability to move his or her audience. This year’s winner has made her mark both before and behind the camera, and she is the director of a new film, A Serious Game, which is screened in the main programme during this year’s festival.

 

 

ABOUT THE AWARDS

 

The Audience Award consists of a copperplate print by Ivar Rudi, given by the Norwegian International Film Festival. The jury consisted of Trude Meling, Lillian Leirvik, Tor-Erik Richardsen, David Lampe and Kjersti Falch.

 

The Ray of Sunshine is a statuette made by Fritz Røed, given by the bank DNB Nor. The jury is appointed by the Norwegian Cinema Managers Association and consisted of Hanne Jacobsen from Bømlo kino, Even Thunes Jensen from Kongsberg kino, Ingunn Myklevoll Sjøen from Egersund kino and Jury President Christin Berg from Nordisk Film kino.

 

The Andreas Award is named after the film critic, theologian and pedagogue Andreas Borch Sandsdalen. The award is a copperplate print by Eli Hovdenak, given by the newspaper Vårt Land, the Norwegian International Film Festival and Film & Kino. The jury is appointed by Vårt Land and consisted of Bishop Erling J. Pettersen, Cinema Manager Eli Røthe, Film Critic Kristin Aalen and film critic and arts editor of the newspaper Vårt Land, Alf Kjetil Walgermo, who also served as Jury President.

 

The Film Critics Award is a copperplate print by Olaf Storø. The jury is appointed by the Norwegian Film Critics Association and consisted of Øyvor Dalan Vik, Lars Ole Kristiansen and Mode Steinkjer.

 

The FIPRESCI Award is given to the best Nordic film, and is presented by a jury appointed by FIPRESCI, the international federation of film critics. The jury consisted of Brian D Johnson from Canada, Gyorg Karpati from Hungary and Nils Olav Sæverås from Norway.

 

Best Project Award is the result of a vote among the participants at the Nordic Co-Production Market and is given to the best film presented as a film project. It is given by Producers Network, Festival de Cannes.

 

Next Nordic Generation Award is the Norwegian International Film Festival’s competition programme for Nordic graduation films. The programme was established in 2014. This year the jury consisted of the directors Bent Hamer and Yngvild Sve Flikke, in addition to Eivind M. Nordengen, General Manager of the Norwegian Student Film Festival, and Martin Øsmundset, Assistant Programme Director of the Norwegian International Film Festival.

 

Eurimages Lab Project Award is intended to reward the most promising ”cutting edge” film of the works-in-progress part of New Nordic Films. The award is to be given to a film that is experimental, either in form or content, or in moving outside the traditional film production framework. It shall also be a result of international co-operation. The award consists of 50,000 Euro. The jury consisted of Norwegian director Bent Hamer, Dorien Van de Pas, leader of the talent development programme at the Netherlands Film Fund, and Heidi Zwicker, programmer for the Sundance Film Festival in the US.

 

The Faun of the City of Haugesund is a statuette by Fritz Røed, given by the Mayor of Haugesund. The Faun is given to a person who has visited the Norwegian International Film Festival numerous times, who has made a significant effort in furthering Norwegian cinema and its movie theatre scene, and last, but not least, the winner shall have a special liking for Haugesund.

 

The Hestenes Award is a journalist award for film, portrait and other arts journalism. It was established by Arne Hestenes, a journalist at the newspaper Dagbladet, in co-operation with the Norwegian International Film Festival and the Institute of Journalism. It was presented for the first time in 1993.

 

The Norwegian International Film Festival and Liv Ullmann Honorary Award is a statuette by the sculptor Nina Sundbye. The award is given to an actor or director who, through an outstanding ability to move the audience, has significantly contributed to film art.